The fear of french negroes johnson sara e. The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas by Sarah E. Johnson 2019-01-25

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Dream Variants: Sara Johnson's Fear of French Negroes

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

Likewise, Petion's republic in the southern half of Haiti in the 1810s lending aid and refuge for Venezuelan and Colombian nationalist liberators was contradictory in terms of the maintenace of racial slavery in the soon to be free Latin American state of Gran Colombia as well. The first chapter is the most deeply rooted in contemporary sources, and the most edifying. Johnson examines the migration of people, ideas, and practices across imperial boundaries. I focus on the experiences of people who had little expectation that their stories would be preserved. Once they become subjects, the full range of their emotional and physical reactions to life during the time period is open to study.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

English Heart, Hindi Heartland: The Political Life of Literature in India, by Rashmi Sadana 9. Domingo and of Exercising Them by Chasseurs, 1805 8. Michael Dash, Joan Colin Dayan, Laurent Dubois, Katherine Dunham, Raul FernĂĄndez, Sybille Fischer, Barry David Gaspar, David Geggus, Edouard Glissant, Sandra Gunning, Saidiya Hartman, C. The Fear of French Negroes is an interdisciplinary study that explores how people of African descent responded to the collapse and reconsolidation of colonial life in the aftermath of the Haitian Revolution 1791-1845. Their struggle to connect was where a hopeful politics existed, sometimes even thrived. Using visual culture, popular music and dance, periodical literature, historical memoirs, and state papers, Sara E.

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The Fear of French Negroes : Sara E. Johnson : 9780520271128

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

The use of canine torture and the debate it engendered recurred in the public sphere with the allegations surrounding the American prison at Abu Ghraib, and I close by examining continuities between the Age of Revolution and the contemporary War on Terror. I examine the migration of people, ideas, and practices across colonial boundaries from the 1790s to the 1840s. Manner of Playing the Ka, 1889 28. This collapsing figure is black and is depicted in the act of slitting his throat. Whether they viewed the revolution as anathema to be contained at all costs so as not to contaminate neighboring slave-holding regimes or, conversely, as a source of hope and new opportunities, the populations under examination all grappled with the revolution as a factor in their quests for profit, freedom, and sanctuary. For example, it is commonplace to acknowledge the web of connections linking Saint-Domingue and neighboring Louisiana.

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Dream Variants: Sara Johnson's Fear of French Negroes

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

These techniques were employed during the Haitian Revolution 1791-1803 , the Second Maroon War in Jamaica 1795-96 , and the Second Seminole War in Territorial Florida 1835-1842 , the three largest-scale conflicts pitting the colonial state against African and indigenous populations from the 1790s-1840s. The result of a thirteen-year war with the most technologically advanced armies of imperial France, England, and Spain, the 1804 Declaration of Independence that marked the passage of power from Saint-Domingue to Haiti made the new nation the first independent Caribbean and Latin American country, and the only nation born out of a successful slave revolt. My eternal thanks to the crew for the many hours spent working together, exchanging ideas, and just generally hanging out. Johnson, The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas. A close study of one such clash in Jamaica in 1819 between slave runaways in the Hellshire Hills and the colonial state offers a new perspective.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas by Sarah E. Johnson

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

I am interested in how the dread felt by Romain and his family and the gruesome nature of his suicide convert the oft-touted horrors of Saint-Domingue away from those chronicled by white refugees, to the horrors of slavery itself as practiced both on the island and during the subsequent diaspora occasioned by the revolution. At both the practical and more imaginative levels, how did free people of color and slaves each articulate what they considered to be the most desirable postrevolutionary political subjectivity? Quite the opposite was often the case. Courtesy of the Library Company of Philadelphia. It is from this perspective that Johnson demonstrates how colonial powers uniting across frontiers —French, British, Spanish, and North-American slave-holding societies—collaborated and used warfare techniques such as canine torture i. FlashPoints aims for a broad audience within the humanities and the social sciences concerned with moments of cultural emergence and transformation. The author analyzes the colonial experience between inter-island blacks by linking seminal events in colonial Cuba, Jamaica, and territorial Florida with revolutionary events in Saint-Domingue. She is currently working on a book documenting the work of Moreau de Saint-MĂ©ry, a late eighteenth-century Caribbean intellectual.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas by Sara E. Johnson

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

In each case we are reminded that the meaning of this historic moment for people of African descent must be asked across as well as within assumed geographies. Though nothing ground-breaking perhaps, and occasionally weakened by a lack of direct sources that, to paraphrase Spivak, leaves the subaltern unable to speak, Johnson's text is a call for further work by historians, musicologists, linguists, and specialists in Atlantic Studies, Caribbean Studies, Latin American Studies, French Studies, and African Diasporic Studies to do additional research. For example, her reading of the images of the Haitian Revolution that were printed and published throughout the Atlantic world remind us that widespread fear must have been felt by all in such a chaotic and violent time and place. Finally, thanks to Dixa RamĂ­rez for her help editing the bibliography, and to Marilyn Bliss for compiling the index. Trenton: Africa World Press 2005 : 35-58. Contemporary sources make it clear that a merchant living in Saint-Domingue might have had contact with family in Philadelphia or New Orleans, and a slave who had run off to Cuba or Spanish Florida in search of freedom under a writ of Catholic sanctuary might try to share news with fellow slaves back home in South Carolina or Jamaica.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas by Sara E. Johnson

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

And yes, her approach is interesting. Discussion of these pieces extends over two articles in sequential issues of this journal, focusing first on perhaps the best known of the early finds - the Carpenter's Mountain group; the second article will explore other eighteenth-century discoveries, as well as carvings brought to public attention in recent decades, such as the Aboukir sculptures. In Atlas Minor of a Set of Sixty Two New and Correct Maps of All Parts of the World London: Thomas and John Bowles, ca. Building on previous scholarship on black internationalism, she traces expressions of both aesthetic and experiential transcolonial black politics across the Caribbean world, including Hispaniola, Louisiana and the Gulf South, Jamaica, and Cuba. It is a classic example of the white fright images that circulated in the Atlantic world during the first decades of the nineteenth century. Johnson adds to our understanding of the constraints and opportunities available to people of color in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries following the Haitian Revolution.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas by Sarah E. Johnson

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

Exact figures recording the total number of refugees who left Saint-Domingue are not available. The images also embody very different ideas of what Saint-Domingue and its revolution meant to diverse populations of the colonial Americas. This memory has been vividly preserved in the visual record, as well as in historical fiction by African American and Caribbean intellectuals. Canine Warfare in the Circum-Caribbean Cuban Bloodhounds and Transcolonial Terror Networks A Discursive Battle of Wills Culture and Public Memory 2. Building on previous scholarship on black internationalism, she traces expressions of both aesthetic and experiential transcolonial black politics across the Caribbean world, including Hispaniola, Louisiana and the Gulf South, Jamaica, and Cuba. The first chapter is the most deeply rooted in contemporary sources, and the most edifying.

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The Fear of French Negroes: Transcolonial Collaboration in the Revolutionary Americas (FlashPoints #12)

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

A Spanish Chasseur of the Island of Cuba, 1803 9. We lost you too soon. These stories move beyond a consideration of the well-documented anxiety insurgent blacks occasioned in slaveholding systems to refocus attention on the wide variety of strategic alliances they generated in their quests for freedom, equality and profit. These stories move beyond a consideration of the well-documented anxiety insurgent blacks occasioned in slaveholding systems to refocus attention on the wide variety of strategic alliances they generated in their quests for freedom, equality and profit. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012. The Fear of French Negroes is an interdisciplinary study that explores how people of African descent responded to the collapse and reconsolidation of colonial life in the aftermath of the Haitian Revolution 1791-1845.

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The Fear of French Negroes by Sara E. Johnson (ebook)

the fear of french negroes johnson sara e

These highlighted periods not only provide substantial insight into imperial politics but also shed light on the relations between these two neighboring countries. NĂ©gresse, et femme mulĂątre de St. Another image lends a different perspective to the one captured above. Many thanks to the Library Company of Philadelphia, especially Jim Green, Philip Lapansky, and Linda Wisniewski. This title traces expressions of both aesthetic and experiential transcolonial black politics across the Caribbean world, including Hispaniola, Louisiana and the Gulf South, Jamaica and Cuba. Moses and Multiculturalism, by Barbara Johnson, with a foreword by Barbara Rietveld 3.

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